Bipolar? Exercise Will Change Your Life

Many apologies for the missed posts last week! I’ve been tripping into mania, so managing my day to day life has been a struggle lately. Thank you for your patience!

When it comes to actions you can take to improve your quality of life, exercising regularly is largely considered the uncontested champion. As we covered in our post Why Weight Gain is Devastating to the Mentally Ill, a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet are linked to a worsening of bipolar and schizophrenic symptoms and decreased functioning. One of the triggers of depressive episodes is reduced physical activity, which is only the start of a vicious cycle.

A comprehensive review of research from 1966 to 2008 proved that scheduled exercise dramatically improves both the body and mind in persons with bipolar disorder. Not only does exercise flood someone with endorphins, studies indicate that it reduces the “allostatic load“, which is the damage done to your body from chronic stress.

Despite all of these good things, I know how difficult it can be to start exercising—much less follow a routine. But, starting slow is better than not starting at all. If you’re like me and can’t handle—or don’t have the time for—an hour-long workout, then just try walking for twenty minutes per day, ten minutes at a time. Eventually, you can build on your small triumphs. In our next post, we’ll cover how to squeeze in a workout around your kids’ schedules and a little bit about what to do if you have physical disabilities.

Make sure to pack plenty of healthy snacks and water to refresh yourself—and your little ones—during and after your workouts. If you are taking medications, do not become dehydrated! Lithium is especially dangerous to dehydrated persons because the body retains it when losing fluids. This can lead to lithium toxicity, which means the level in your blood has built up faster than it can be excreted by the kidneys. Side effects include dizziness, diarrhea, and vomiting, which worsens fluid loss. If the level is especially concentrated, you may slip into a coma or enter a psychotic state, both of which can damage you neurologically.

As always, please consult a physician before trying any program which involves changes to your levels of physical activity. Please ask your doctor about the effects your medications may have on your body during periods of high exertion, and to what extent you are able to work out in order to avoid symptoms like dizziness. A trained medical professional will recommend exercises tailored to your needs and health.

So start slow and good luck!

What is your favorite way to get moving and grooving?

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About Cassandra Stout

Freelance writer Cassandra Stout blogs at the award-winning Bipolar Parent, a comprehensive resource for parents with mental illnesses. Cassandra holds degrees from the University of Arizona in Creative Writing and Journalism. She has been a judge for the Pacific Northwest Writers' Association literary contest for nine years, where her memoir, Committed, recently placed as a finalist. She balances her literary work with raising her children, feeding her cat, and managing her bipolar disorder.
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2 Responses to Bipolar? Exercise Will Change Your Life

  1. Pingback: How to Work Out with a 40-pound Parasite Clinging to Your Leg | The Bipolar Parent

  2. Pingback: Pregnant While Bipolar | The Bipolar Parent

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