The Bipolar Parent Master Link List

bipolar
A picture of a double-headed man. One head is smiling, and the other is screaming. Credit to flickr.com user Remy Estepario. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

Why, hello, there! The Bipolar Parent just celebrated an anniversary of sorts: two years of weekly posts! The blog has technically been running for about six years, but back when it started, posts were infrequent due to my not having my bipolar disorder under control. I was either riding the highs of mania and unable to focus, or suffering from the lows of depression and unable to muster up the energy to do much of anything, much less blog.

But now that I’ve stabilized on Wellbutrin and Risperidone, I’ve been able to update weekly and keep on top of posting. Here is the Master Link list to almost all of my posts. Enjoy the site, and thanks for stopping by!

  1. The Bipolar Parent’s Saturday Morning Mental Health Check In: Sleep Edition
  2. Have Bipolar? You Can Still Thrive This Holiday Season
  3. The Bipolar Parent’s Saturday Morning Mental Health Check In: Mother-In-Law Edition
  4. How to Manage the Winter Blues/Seasonal Affective Disorder
  5. The Bipolar Parent’s Saturday Morning Mental Health Check In: How Are You?
  6. 11 Lessons I Learned From 11 Years of Managing Bipolar Disorder
  7. How to Support a Friend or Loved One Staying in a Psychiatric Hospital
  8. Dear Younger Me: You’re Bipolar, and That’s Okay
  9. Crisis Hotline Numbers and Resources Master Post
  10. What is a Warmline, and How Do You Use Them?
  11. Tips and Resources for Online Support Groups
  12. Getting Support During a Bipolar Depression Episode
  13. How to Communicate with Family During the Holidays When You Have a Mental Illness
  14. 10 Signs That You Are a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP)
  15. Book Review: Balancing Act: Writing Through a Bipolar Life, by Kitt O’Malley
  16. Can a Whole-Foods, Plant-Based Diet Improve Depression?
  17. How to Start Seeing a Therapist
  18. Easing Anxiety About the End of the World: 4 Steps to Combat Climate Change
  19. How to Shield Your Children From the Effects of Your Bipolar Disorder
  20. Bipolar Disorder and Insomnia–And What to do About Sleep Disturbances
  21. Common Pitfalls When Communicating With Your Kids About Your Bipolar Disorder, part II
  22. Common Pitfalls When Communicating With Your Kids About Your Bipolar Disorder, part I
  23. Probiotics May Help Treat Bipolar Disorder
  24. Does Inflammation Cause Bipolar Disorder?
  25. National Depression Awareness Month: My Experience and How to Get Support
  26. National Prevention Week: How I Prevent Oncoming Bipolar Mood Episodes
  27. Book Review: Breakdown: A Clinician’s Experience in a Broken System of Emergency Psychiatry
  28. How Specific Gene Variants May Raise Bipolar Disorder Risk
  29. Shot Through the Heart, and Bipolar Disorder’s to Blame: You Have a Higher Risk of Cardiovascular Disease if You’re Bipolar
  30. How Does Spoon Theory Relate to Mental Illness?
  31. Are You White? You Have a Better Chance of Being Properly Treated for Bipolar Disorder
  32. KonMari Revisited: A Review of the KonMari Method in Tackling the Clutter Demon With Bipolar Disorder
  33. Maternal Bipolar Disorder Significantly Increases Risk for Premature Births
  34. How to Manage Common Bipolar Triggers
  35. How to Survive a Stint in the Mental Hospital
  36. How to Talk to Someone Experiencing a Bipolar Mood Episode
  37. How to Spot Bipolar Disorder in Teens and What to do About it
  38. What Are the Differences Between Bipolar in Children and Bipolar in Adults?
  39. Preemies Have Higher Risk to Develop Bipolar Disorder
  40. How to Spot Depression in Children, Even Preschoolers
  41. How Sugar May Harm Your Mental Health
  42. America has Highest Rate of Bipolar Disorder Diagnoses in 11-Nation Study
  43. Can Early Symptoms Predict Bipolar Disorder? Evidence Shows Differing Patterns of Risk Factors
  44. The Links Between Fibromyalgia and Bipolar Disorder
  45. Brain Training Shows Promise for Patients with Bipolar Disorder
  46. The Bipolar Parent Master Link List
  47. Scientists Link Bipolar Disorder to Unexpected Brain Region
  48. A Quarter of People with Fibromyalgia Show Bipolar Symptoms
  49. Bipolar Disorder Medication and Weight Gain
  50. How to Treat Common Side Effects of Bipolar Medication
  51. How to Clean Your House with Bipolar Disorder and a Toddler, part II
  52. How to Clean Your House with Bipolar Disorder and a Toddler, part I
  53. How to Follow a Mediterranean Diet to Help Manage Bipolar Depression
  54. What is Hypergraphia, and How Does It Relate to Bipolar Disorder?
  55. My Manifestations of Bipolar Mania: Crafting and Frugality
  56. Tackling the Clutter Demon with Bipolar Disorder
  57. Book Review: Dyane Harwood’s Birth of a New Brain
  58. Good, Good, Good Nutrition, Part II: Foods to Avoid When Managing Bipolar Disorder
  59. Good, Good, Good Nutrition, part I: Foods to Eat to Help Manage Bipolar Disorder
  60. Bipolar Disorder Manifests Differently in People Who Binge Eat
  61. Family Study Emphasizes Distinct Origins for Bipolar Disorder Subtypes
  62. Interview With My Parents: On Raising a Bipolar Child
  63. People With Bipolar Disorder More Likely to Die From Age-Related Diseases
  64. Bipolar Disorder Diagnosable By a 15-minute Electrocardiogram, Study Finds
  65. Book Review: Rock Steady: Brilliant Advice From My Bipolar Life
  66. 22 Easy Meals to Make While Depressed
  67. Dealing With Mental Illness Privilege Guilt
  68. Left-handed People Require Different Mental Health Treatments, Study Finds
  69. Gene Breakthrough on Lithium Treatment for Bipolar Disorder
  70. Light Therapy Helps Bipolar Disorder Patients Function
  71. Brain Protein Targeted to Develop New Bipolar Disorder Therapies
  72. Pot Smoking in Teens Linked to Bipolar Symptoms
  73. Children with Bipolar Disorder May Be Diagnosed with Vitamin D Blood Test In the Future
  74. Bipolar Patients Treated with Lithium Rehospitalized Less
  75. Scientists Conclude After 12-year Study That Bipolar Disorder Has Seven Causes
  76. Treatable Condition Could be Mistaken for Bipolar Disorder
  77. People with a Family History of Bipolar Disorder Have Reduced Planning Ability
  78. People At-Risk for Bipolar Disorder May Age Faster
  79. Men and Women Differ When it Comes to Bipolar Biomarkers
  80. Researchers Create Global Map of How Bipolar Disorder Affects the Brain
  81. AI Used for Blowing Pilots Out of the Sky Helps Bipolar Patients
  82. Bipolar? Your Brain is Wired to Make Poor Decisions
  83. Six-Year Delay Between Onset of Bipolar Disorder and Diagnosis, Study Finds
  84. Molecular Mechanism Behind Lithium’s Effectiveness Identified
  85. Children at High Risk for Bipolar Disorder Genetically Vulnerable to Stress
  86. Hippocampus Volume Decreases Linked to Bipolar Disorder
  87. Depression Changes Our Language
  88. Bipolar Genes Linked to Autism
  89. Genes Linked to Creativity Could Increase Risk of Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia
  90. Bipolar Disorder Increases Risk of Early Death From Natural Causes
  91. How to Handle Intrusive Thoughts
  92. What Does High Functioning Depression Look Like?
  93. Which Mental Health Professional Should You Use?
  94. The History of the Treatment of Mental Illness
  95. Can Bipolar Disorder Symptoms Contribute to Hoarding?
  96. Bipolar? You Can Survive This Holiday Season, part II
  97. Bipolar? You Can Survive This Holiday Season, part I
  98. New Research Pinpoints Bipolar Disorder Gene
  99. What Types of Therapies Are Right For You?
  100. How to Get a Psychiatric Evaluation
  101. Disclosing That You Have a Mental Illness, part IV: Your Employer
  102. Disclosing That You Have a Mental Illness, part III: Friends and Family
  103. Disclosing That You Have a Mental Illness, part II: How
  104. Disclosing That You Have a Mental Illness, part I: When
  105. Bipolar Patients More Than Twice As Likely to Have Suffered Childhood Adversity
  106. Scientists Predict Who Will Respond to Lithium
  107. What to do if Your Child has Bipolar Disorder
  108. Bipolar Disorder in Children
  109. How to Apply for Disability Benefits for Mental Disorders
  110. Antibiotics Linked to Manic Episodes
  111. Why Should You Chart Your Moods if You Have Bipolar Disorder?
  112. Bipolar Disorder is Toxic–Literally
  113. Antibodies That Cause Encephalitis Linked to Psychosis
  114. Can Blueberry Extract Help Prevent Postpartum Blues?
  115. Substance Abuse and Bipolar Disorder
  116. Bipolar Disorder in Women
  117. App to Detect Onset of Mania In Development by Sane Australia
  118. What to do if You Run Out of Medication
  119. 4 Ways to Educate Someone About Mental Illness
  120. The History of Bipolar Disorder
  121. Mental Illness in the Media–An Incomplete Picture
  122. 5 Ways to Cope with a Diagnosis of Mental Illness
  123. 8 Myths About Mental Illness
  124. Learned Behaviors: Passing on Coping Mechanisms
  125. Nature vs. Nurture: The Causes of Bipolar Disorder
  126. What is Bipolar Disorder?
  127. 6 Strategies for Parenting with a Mental Illness
  128. How to Talk To Your Kids About Mental Illness
  129. The Price of Mental Health
  130. What is Postpartum Psychosis?
  131. How Mental Health Affects Personal Hygiene
  132. The Prevalence of “Nuts”
  133. “How Do You Define Mentally Ill?”
  134. Pregnant While Bipolar
  135. Executive Function and Bipolar Disorder
  136. Safe Medications to Take While Breastfeeding
  137. Stabilizing Medications: Risperidone and Wellbutrin
  138. What is Bipolar Depression?
  139. Bipolar and Suicidal? You’re Not Alone
  140. The Gold Standards of Bipolar Medication, part II
  141. The Gold Standards of Bipolar Medication, part I
  142. Are You “Covering” For Your Illnesses?
  143. How to Clean When Your Brain is a Mess, part III
  144. How to Clean When Your Brain is a Mess, part II
  145. How to Clean Your House When Your Brain is a Mess, part I
  146. How Privilege Affects Mental Healthcare
  147. How to Get Your Much-Needed Forty Winks
  148. How to Work Out with a 40-pound Parasite Clinging to Your Leg
  149. Bipolar? Exercise Will Change Your Life
  150. Good, Good, Good, Good Nutrition!
  151. Why Medicinal Weight Gain is Devastating to the Mentally Ill
  152. What is Cyclothymia?
  153. The Importance of Team You, Part V
  154. The Importance of Team You, Part IV
  155. The Importance of Team You, Part III
  156. The Importance of Team You, Part II
  157. The Importance of Team You, part I
  158. A Breath of Fresh Air: Deep Breathing Techniques
  159. A Beautiful Mind
  160. Hypomania: A Closer Look
  161. What is Hypomania?
  162. What is Mania?

A Quarter of People With Fibromyalgia Show Bipolar Disorder Symptoms

Fibromyalgia and bipolar disorder appear to be connected. New research shows that a quarter of fibromyalgia patients who were screened tested positive for bipolar symptoms. Because these diseases are found in tandem, it’s known as comorbidity. If you have one disorder going on, despite their differences, you might have both.

hache.jpg
Credit to flickr.com user CJS*64. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

The causes of fibromyalgia are yet to be discovered, and up to 5% of the population may be affected. More common in women, fibromyalgia is a disorder that causes muscle and joint aches. Other symptoms are fatigue, and, occasionally, depression.

Dr. William Wilke from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio and his colleagues gave 128 patients with fibromyalgia four questionnaires. The first was the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) for bipolar disorder, to determine the link between bipolar and fibromyalgia. Next was the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depression. The scientists also used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) for daytime sleepiness, and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire Disability Index (FIQ‐DI) to assess for functional capacity.

According to the MDQ screen, just over 25% of the patients were likely to have bipolar disorder, demonstrating a clear link between fibromyalgia and bipolar disorder. People who showed symptoms of bipolar also suffered from more severe depressions than people who didn’t show symptoms of bipolar disorder, which is really no surprise, given bipolar disorder’s depressions.

The BDI’s results were also of interest: 79% of the fibromyalgia patients were clinically depressed. Of those people, up to a third of the people who suffered from depression also reported symptoms of bipolar disorder.

The ESS showed that 52% of the patients with fibromyalgia–just over half–experienced daytime sleepiness, which doesn’t relate to bipolar disorder, but is interesting nonetheless.

Wilke’s team pointed out that some medications that treat fibromyalgia may also trigger mania in bipolar patients, and therefore doctors are urged to be cautious.

So, if you have fibromyalgia, you might want to talk to your doctor about the potential for bipolar disorder before you take medications to treat the disease, because those medications can trigger manic episodes. Similarly, if you have bipolar disorder, those muscle aches and fatigue might be something more; get screened for fibromyalgia.

Family Study Emphasizes Distinct Origins for Bipolar Disorder Subtypes

family
Credit to flickr.com user Kat Grigg. Used with permission under a Creative Commons license.

The most common subtypes of bipolar disorder, bipolar I and bipolar II, stem—at least in part—from different biological causes, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. Despite genetic overlap between the two subtypes, each subtype tended to cluster within families, suggesting a distinction between bipolar disorders I and II.

The study, by Dr. Jie Song of the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and colleagues helps settle controversy over the relationship between bipolar I and bipolar II disorders. Although genetic similarities indicate overlap between the subtypes, the new findings emphasize different origins. According to Song, this is contrary to a common notion among many clinicians that bipolar II disorder is merely a milder form.

“We have tended to view the two forms of bipolar disorder as variants of the same clinical condition. However, this new study highlights important differences in the heritable risk for these two disorders,” said Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.

The study is the first nationwide family study to explore the difference between the two main subtypes of bipolar disorder. Dr. Song and colleagues analyzed the occurrence of the bipolar disorder subtypes in families from the Swedish national registers. Although a strong genetic correlation between bipolar I and bipolar II disorder suggests that they are not completely different, the family occurrence for each subtype was stronger than co-occurrence between the subtypes, indicating that bipolar I and bipolar II disorders tend to “run” in families separately, rather than occurring together.

“Within the context of our emerging appreciation of polygenic risk, where gene variations are implicated in several disorders, the new findings point to only partial overlap in the risk mechanisms for these two forms of bipolar disorder,” said Dr. Krystal.

The study also provided some additional clues that bipolar I and II disorders have distinct origins. Only bipolar disorder II showed gender differences—the proportion of females to males was higher in bipolar disorder II but not bipolar disorder I. And bipolar I clustered together in families with schizophrenia, which was not apparent for bipolar disorder II.

“Hopefully, our findings increase awareness of the need for refined distinctions between subtypes of mood disorder,” said Dr. Song. The distinction between the subtypes also has implications for treatment strategies for patients. Dr. Song added that future research is warranted to characterize new biomarkers to improve treatment and prognosis.

Text provided by Elsevier.

The Future of the Bipolar Parent: What Are You Interested In?

As a blogger, I’m interested in what my readers want. I’d like to cater to your interests. I’m curious to see which direction you think the Bipolar Parent should take, so I’ve created a poll to try and narrow down which posts you’re personally looking for. Please take the time to answer the poll, and, if you’re feeling inspired, leave a comment to explain your choice. The poll will be open forever. Thank you!

ETA: I just noticed that the poll code didn’t work, so I’ve replaced the code with something that hopefully will. Thanks for your patience with our technical difficulties!

ETA2: I apologize, but I’ve found I cannot make a poll without JavaScript, which WordPress does not support in free accounts. Looks like this experiment was a bust! If you’re interested, please comment on what you’d like to see out of the Bipolar Parent: Scientific Articles, Personal Experience, Advice, Guest Posts, or All of the Above. I’d love to hear your thoughts!